Join Me at an Artist’s Reception for My Photography Exhibition: Enjoy free wine, hors-d’oeuvres, conversation, and my travel images!

Update: My solo show is now officially open!  If you live in or will be visiting the San Francisco Bay Area, please come by the cafe any time until August 19 to see my work.  Read on for more details about the show and the Artist’s Reception to be held on July 10.

Please join me for an artist’s reception showcasing my photography exhibition, “Spirit of Place”, to be held this coming Tuesday, July 10, from 6-8 PM at Cafe Borrone in Menlo Park, California. This event is free and open to the public. Wine and hors-d’oeuvres will be provided by the cafe. No tickets are required, but it would help the event planners if you could mark yourself as “Interested” or “Going”, as appropriate. Please share with others who may be interested.
 
Spirit of Place: Travel Photography by Kyle Adler
 
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – Mark Twain
 
Artist’s Statement:
I’ve heard grumblings that photography inhibits deep cultural learning and interaction when we visit new places. Our cameras, this line of reasoning goes, isolate us from the local people we’re trying to get to know. The lens, detractors believe, acts as a distancing device to turn locals into subjects and travelers into tourists. I disagree emphatically! Photography is a powerful tool for meeting local people and bridging the gap between their culture and ours, immersing ourselves even more deeply into the spirit of the place and the lives of the people who live there.
 
During the course of my travels, I strive to get off the beaten path, seek the authentic, and create a narrative that captures in images the unique spirit of each place and its people, as well as the universal truths that unite us all. My mission is to balance rendering the artistic beauty of the lands and cultures we visit with advocacy to improve the lives of the people we meet.
 
There will be an artist’s reception held on Tuesday, July 10 from 6-8 PM at the Café. Please join me for an evening of hors-d’oeuvres, wine, and conversation about the role of image-making in documenting what we all share and what makes us unique in the world.
 

Biography:
Kyle Adler is a professional travel photographer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. A recent winner of the prestigious international competition Travel Photographer of the Year, and shortlisted for the 2016 National Geographic Travel Photography competition, Kyle has been published in a variety of outlets internationally including National Geographic Online, CNN, The Telegraph, The Atlantic, Measure Magazine, the photography book eXtremy, and fine art and commercial photography sites. His images have been exhibited in the US, the UK, and throughout the world. The leading Polish photography site, “Szeroki Kadr,” recently featured him as a Photographer of Inspiration.
 
Kyle is passionate about helping fellow travelers improve their photography while learning to explore our world with greater cultural awareness and advocacy. He leads small group workshops and tours focused on learning to use the camera as a bridge to enhanced understanding of the land and people we visit.
 
While not traveling, Kyle shoots and writes for newspapers, magazines, travel publications, and private clients, with an emphasis on travel, performing arts, and cultural festivals. In addition to publishing a daily blog on travel photography, he is currently working
on a book project documenting in images the cultural diversity of the San Francisco Bay Area. To view Kyle’s portfolio, please visit www.kadlerphotography.com, or contact him at kyle.adler.2@gmail.com.
 

“Kyle Adler belongs behind a lens. In the hands of a master, a camera can actually create connections with local people and bring their culture to life. Kyle creates stunning photo narratives of his trips.”
— Harriet Lewis, Vice Chairman, Overseas Adventure Travel

Travel Photographers of the World, Unite!: Join my Meetup group

Dear Readers,

I have organized a new Meetup group, Travel Photography Workshops, as a forum to connect and learn in a variety of different ways. Whether through photo walks, hands-on workshops, classes, exhibitions, and photography tours to locations around the world, our goal will always be to fuel our passion for travel photography as we grow our skills. Please join us! Details at: http://meetu.ps/c/3Yl63/vbccL/f.

Love to explore the world through a lens? Do you strive to capture authentic images of the people and places you visit? Excited about using your camera to build bridges across diverse cultures? Want to continually improve your photography in all genres? Then this meetup is for you!

Travel photography is thrilling because it’s about discovery and adventure. Whether we’re halfway around the world or a few short blocks from our home, our camera is a tool to capture the spirit of the places we visit and to share that spirit with our community. The travel photographer must be versatile, switching effortlessly among many genres including landscape, wildlife, cityscape, portrait, performing arts, nighttime, and street photography. Share your passion for travel photography with other like-minded enthusiasts, and build your skills in a supportive community.

We’ll connect and learn in a variety of different ways. Whether through photo walks, hands-on workshops, classes, exhibitions, and photography tours to locations around the world, our goal will always be to fuel our passion for travel photography as we grow our skills. Please join us!

Join Me at an Artist’s Reception for My Photography Exhibition: Enjoy free wine, hors-d’oeuvres, conversation, and my travel images!

Update: My solo show is now officially open!  If you live in or will be visiting the San Francisco Bay Area, please come by the cafe any time until August 19 to see my work.  Read on for more details about the show and the Artist’s Reception to be held on July 10.

Please join me for an artist’s reception showcasing my photography exhibition, “Spirit of Place”, to be held on Tuesday, July 10 from 6-8 PM at Cafe Borrone in Menlo Park, California. This event is free and open to the public. Wine and hors-d’oeuvres will be provided by the cafe. No tickets are required, but it would help the event planners if you could mark yourself as “Interested” or “Going”, as appropriate. Please share with others who may be interested.
 
Spirit of Place: Travel Photography by Kyle Adler
 
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – Mark Twain
 
Artist’s Statement:
I’ve heard grumblings that photography inhibits deep cultural learning and interaction when we visit new places. Our cameras, this line of reasoning goes, isolate us from the local people we’re trying to get to know. The lens, detractors believe, acts as a distancing device to turn locals into subjects and travelers into tourists. I disagree emphatically! Photography is a powerful tool for meeting local people and bridging the gap between their culture and ours, immersing ourselves even more deeply into the spirit of the place and the lives of the people who live there.
 
During the course of my travels, I strive to get off the beaten path, seek the authentic, and create a narrative that captures in images the unique spirit of each place and its people, as well as the universal truths that unite us all. My mission is to balance rendering the artistic beauty of the lands and cultures we visit with advocacy to improve the lives of the people we meet.
 
There will be an artist’s reception held on Tuesday, July 10 from 6-8 PM at the Café. Please join me for an evening of hors-d’oeuvres, wine, and conversation about the role of image-making in documenting what we all share and what makes us unique in the world.
 

Biography:
Kyle Adler is a professional travel photographer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. A recent winner of the prestigious international competition Travel Photographer of the Year, and shortlisted for the 2016 National Geographic Travel Photography competition, Kyle has been published in a variety of outlets internationally including National Geographic Online, CNN, The Telegraph, The Atlantic, Measure Magazine, the photography book eXtremy, and fine art and commercial photography sites. His images have been exhibited in the US, the UK, and throughout the world. The leading Polish photography site, “Szeroki Kadr,” recently featured him as a Photographer of Inspiration.
 
Kyle is passionate about helping fellow travelers improve their photography while learning to explore our world with greater cultural awareness and advocacy. He leads small group workshops and tours focused on learning to use the camera as a bridge to enhanced understanding of the land and people we visit.
 
While not traveling, Kyle shoots and writes for newspapers, magazines, travel publications, and private clients, with an emphasis on travel, performing arts, and cultural festivals. In addition to publishing a daily blog on travel photography, he is currently working
on a book project documenting in images the cultural diversity of the San Francisco Bay Area. To view Kyle’s portfolio, please visit www.kadlerphotography.com, or contact him at kyle.adler.2@gmail.com.
 

“Kyle Adler belongs behind a lens. In the hands of a master, a camera can actually create connections with local people and bring their culture to life. Kyle creates stunning photo narratives of his trips.”
— Harriet Lewis, Vice Chairman, Overseas Adventure Travel

“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to have my image selected by National Geographic editors

Dear Readers,

My image of colorful lichens in Iceland’s Lake Myvatn region is among the fewer than 1% of submitted photos selected as an editor’s favorite in National Geographic’s “Everyday Science” assignment. Check it out here, and please consider liking it, as NG does factor in the popular vote when deciding which selected online images to include in the print magazine. Thank you for your support!

https://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/12347875/

 

Join Me at an Artist’s Reception for My Photography Exhibition: Enjoy free wine, hors-d’oeuvres, conversation, and my travel images!

Please join me for an artist’s reception showcasing my photography exhibition, “Spirit of Place”, to be held on Tuesday, July 10 from 6-8 PM at Cafe Borrone in Menlo Park, California. This event is free and open to the public. Wine and hors-d’oeuvres will be provided by the cafe. No tickets are required, but it would help the event planners if you could mark yourself as “Interested” or “Going”, as appropriate. Please share with others who may be interested.
 
Spirit of Place: Travel Photography by Kyle Adler
 
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – Mark Twain
 
Artist’s Statement:
I’ve heard grumblings that photography inhibits deep cultural learning and interaction when we visit new places. Our cameras, this line of reasoning goes, isolate us from the local people we’re trying to get to know. The lens, detractors believe, acts as a distancing device to turn locals into subjects and travelers into tourists. I disagree emphatically! Photography is a powerful tool for meeting local people and bridging the gap between their culture and ours, immersing ourselves even more deeply into the spirit of the place and the lives of the people who live there.
 
During the course of my travels, I strive to get off the beaten path, seek the authentic, and create a narrative that captures in images the unique spirit of each place and its people, as well as the universal truths that unite us all. My mission is to balance rendering the artistic beauty of the lands and cultures we visit with advocacy to improve the lives of the people we meet.
 
There will be an artist’s reception held on Tuesday, July 10 from 6-8 PM at the Café. Please join me for an evening of hors-d’oeuvres, wine, and conversation about the role of image-making in documenting what we all share and what makes us unique in the world.
 

Biography:
Kyle Adler is a professional travel photographer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. A recent winner of the prestigious international competition Travel Photographer of the Year, and shortlisted for the 2016 National Geographic Travel Photography competition, Kyle has been published in a variety of outlets internationally including National Geographic Online, CNN, The Telegraph, The Atlantic, Measure Magazine, the photography book eXtremy, and fine art and commercial photography sites. His images have been exhibited in the US, the UK, and throughout the world. The leading Polish photography site, “Szeroki Kadr,” recently featured him as a Photographer of Inspiration.
 
Kyle is passionate about helping fellow travelers improve their photography while learning to explore our world with greater cultural awareness and advocacy. He leads small group workshops and tours focused on learning to use the camera as a bridge to enhanced understanding of the land and people we visit.
 
While not traveling, Kyle shoots and writes for newspapers, magazines, travel publications, and private clients, with an emphasis on travel, performing arts, and cultural festivals. In addition to publishing a daily blog on travel photography, he is currently working
on a book project documenting in images the cultural diversity of the San Francisco Bay Area. To view Kyle’s portfolio, please visit www.kadlerphotography.com, or contact him at kyle.adler.2@gmail.com.
 

“Kyle Adler belongs behind a lens. In the hands of a master, a camera can actually create connections with local people and bring their culture to life. Kyle creates stunning photo narratives of his trips.”
— Harriet Lewis, Vice Chairman, Overseas Adventure Travel

Dispatches Magazine Story [Encore Publication]: My article on travel photography in Patagonia is published by a leading travel magazine

Dear Readers,

As a travel photographer and writer, I strive to place my stories and images in magazines, newspapers, and websites for travel companies.  My piece on travel photography in Patagonia was just published in Dispatches Magazine.  Dispatches is the quarterly glossy print magazine from Overseas Adventure Travel, one of the largest travel companies in the USA.

I also appreciate the introduction from Overseas Adventure Travel’s Vice Chairman and travel industry leader, Harriet Lewis: “Kyle Adler belongs behind a lens. In the hands of a master, a camera can actually create connections with local people and bring their culture to life. Kyle is a 10-time O.A.T. traveler, and he creates stunning photo narratives of his trips.”

Please take a look!  And thanks, as always, for your great support.

Read Kyle’s article in Dispatches Magazine

Warm Regards,

Kyle

“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to be a winner of the Peninsula Photography Contest

Dear Readers,

I’m proud to report that one of my images was selected as a winner in the Peninsula Photography Contest. It will be exhibited at the Palo Alto Art Center from May 19 through June 17, and will also be featured in several publications and websites.

The winning image, submitted in the Travel Photography category, is a favorite from my recent travels in Myanmar.  It’s part of a series that depicts the difficult plight of the children of the “Bamboo Village”, an informal housing settlement outside of the capital city of Yangon (Rangoon), where 10 years after the disastrous typhoon struck Myanmar many of the displaced are still living in squalid conditions with little government support.

To me, travel photography is about more than just creating art: it’s also a means to connect with local people, capture a strong sense of place, and advocate for social change and justice.  As readers of To Travel Hopefully, you’ve seen me return to these themes again and again.  So I’m especially honored to have this particular image featured in the Peninsula Photography Contest’s winners gallery, and pleased to have this opportunity to share the image and the story behind it more broadly.

The winning image: “A fascinating visit to an informal housing settlement inhabited by people displaced by the devastating 2008 typhoon. A decade later they are still living in squalid conditions in bamboo huts with no running water. Here, children are filling containers with water from the lake and carrying 40 kg (88 pounds) of water, often more than their body weight, several miles to their families’ homes.”

If you live in or near the San Francisco Bay Area, please come to the show at the Palo Alto Art Center between May 19 and June 17.  Thank you for your ongoing support!

News Flash: Google Removes Popular “View Images” Button [Encore Publication]: Why google removed this feature and what it means for photographers

Two days ago, Google rather quietly removed a very popular feature from its search functionality.  As part of a legal settlement with the powerful Getty Images stock photography agency, the search behemoth has agreed to remove the “view images” button that appeared whenever a search result included images.  Clicking on this button would open the image directly in the user’s browser, allowing them to bypass a visit to the website containing the matched image.  Now that word is getting out about this popular feature being removed, the Internet is up in arms, with thousands crying foul and lambasting both companies for this decision.  In today’s post, I focus instead on what this change means for photographers and other intellectual property owners.  And guess what?  It’s a good thing, not a bad thing.

The Web is a mixed bag for photographers.  On the one hand, the Web offers us an instantaneous and inexpensive way for our work to be seen by potentially billions of people around the world.  For professional photographers, the technology allows us to deliver work to clients, share our art, and make new sales with relatively little cost or effort.  On the other hand, the Web also makes it incredibly easy for people to steal our work.  I recently conducted a reverse image search on one of my most popular (and valuable) images, the multiple international-award-winning shot of an alligator with its reflection in the waters of a Louisiana bayou, and found that it currently lives in more than 300 places around the world on the Internet.  A few dozen of those sites are authorized to use my image, such as legitimate news agencies reporting on my having won the awards and certain clients to whom I have licensed the right to use the image, but nearly all of the sites’ publishers are using my work without permission.  In other words, they are thieves.

For photographers, our images represent countless hours of hard work, the application of our talent accrued over a lifetime, considerable financial investment in gear and travel, and for professionals, our livelihood.  The fact that it is convenient and easy to steal our work does not make it ethical or legal to do so.  By removing a search results feature that made theft extremely easy, Google has taken a serious step toward protecting intellectual property rights.

Of course it is still quite easy to grab images off the Web if you have a mind to.  You can click on the “visit page” button in the Google search results, find the image on the website, and right-click on it to save it on your device.  Photographers can make that process a bit harder by adding right-click protection to remind would-be thieves that the image is copyrighted, but there are plenty of ways to get around this protection.

The recent move by Google therefore won’t end the problem of digital image theft overnight, but it’s a good step in the right direction.  Image sharing and legitimate use is preserved, while making things just a tad harder for those who knowingly or unknowingly want to steal other people’s images off the Web.

Google has simultaneously ended the “Search By Image” button that popped up when a user opened an image.  I have mixed feelings about this decision, also a result of the settlement with Getty Images.  While this feature could be used by thieves who want to find un-watermarked copies of photos somewhere on the Web, it’s also very useful for photographers who need to know where our images are appearing around the world.  Fortunately, you can still use this feature simply by dragging the image into the search bar at the top of your browser’s screen.

I hope this post from a working photographer’s perspective will help defuse some of the animus hurled against Google from angry Internet users.  Removing the “View Images” button doesn’t solve all intellectual property theft in one simple move, but it is a reasonable step toward the goal of protecting image copyrights, and that’s a good thing for us photographers and, ultimately, for all users of images.  Because if photographers can’t make a living selling our work, very soon there won’t be any pro-quality images out there.

Do you agree with my viewpoint?  Or do you have a differing opinion?  Please share your comments here!

Want to read my earlier post about what to do if your images are stolen?  Find it here: What to do if your images are stolen.

 

News Flash: Google Removes Popular “View Images” Button [Encore Publication]: Why google removed this feature and what it means for photographers

Two days ago, Google rather quietly removed a very popular feature from its search functionality.  As part of a legal settlement with the powerful Getty Images stock photography agency, the search behemoth has agreed to remove the “view images” button that appeared whenever a search result included images.  Clicking on this button would open the image directly in the user’s browser, allowing them to bypass a visit to the website containing the matched image.  Now that word is getting out about this popular feature being removed, the Internet is up in arms, with thousands crying foul and lambasting both companies for this decision.  In today’s post, I focus instead on what this change means for photographers and other intellectual property owners.  And guess what?  It’s a good thing, not a bad thing.

The Web is a mixed bag for photographers.  On the one hand, the Web offers us an instantaneous and inexpensive way for our work to be seen by potentially billions of people around the world.  For professional photographers, the technology allows us to deliver work to clients, share our art, and make new sales with relatively little cost or effort.  On the other hand, the Web also makes it incredibly easy for people to steal our work.  I recently conducted a reverse image search on one of my most popular (and valuable) images, the multiple international-award-winning shot of an alligator with its reflection in the waters of a Louisiana bayou, and found that it currently lives in more than 300 places around the world on the Internet.  A few dozen of those sites are authorized to use my image, such as legitimate news agencies reporting on my having won the awards and certain clients to whom I have licensed the right to use the image, but nearly all of the sites’ publishers are using my work without permission.  In other words, they are thieves.

For photographers, our images represent countless hours of hard work, the application of our talent accrued over a lifetime, considerable financial investment in gear and travel, and for professionals, our livelihood.  The fact that it is convenient and easy to steal our work does not make it ethical or legal to do so.  By removing a search results feature that made theft extremely easy, Google has taken a serious step toward protecting intellectual property rights.

Of course it is still quite easy to grab images off the Web if you have a mind to.  You can click on the “visit page” button in the Google search results, find the image on the website, and right-click on it to save it on your device.  Photographers can make that process a bit harder by adding right-click protection to remind would-be thieves that the image is copyrighted, but there are plenty of ways to get around this protection.

The recent move by Google therefore won’t end the problem of digital image theft overnight, but it’s a good step in the right direction.  Image sharing and legitimate use is preserved, while making things just a tad harder for those who knowingly or unknowingly want to steal other people’s images off the Web.

Google has simultaneously ended the “Search By Image” button that popped up when a user opened an image.  I have mixed feelings about this decision, also a result of the settlement with Getty Images.  While this feature could be used by thieves who want to find un-watermarked copies of photos somewhere on the Web, it’s also very useful for photographers who need to know where our images are appearing around the world.  Fortunately, you can still use this feature simply by dragging the image into the search bar at the top of your browser’s screen.

I hope this post from a working photographer’s perspective will help defuse some of the animus hurled against Google from angry Internet users.  Removing the “View Images” button doesn’t solve all intellectual property theft in one simple move, but it is a reasonable step toward the goal of protecting image copyrights, and that’s a good thing for us photographers and, ultimately, for all users of images.  Because if photographers can’t make a living selling our work, very soon there won’t be any pro-quality images out there.

Do you agree with my viewpoint?  Or do you have a differing opinion?  Please share your comments here!

Want to read my earlier post about what to do if your images are stolen?  Find it here: What to do if your images are stolen.

 

“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to be featured by leading photography magazine “Szeroki Kadr”

Dear Readers,

I am honored to be featured as a Photographer of Inspiration on “Szeroki Kadr”, the leading Polish photography site. With a global audience of more than 100,000 followers, the Nikon-owned site was created to assist photographers in raising the quality of their art through education and inspiration. An article featuring some of my work and biographical information has just been published on their homepage as well as in their “Inspirations” section.

Please check it out!

Home page: https://www.szerokikadr.pl/

Direct link to my article: https://www.szerokikadr.pl/inspiracje/kyle-adler

Please note: Your browser can probably translate the Polish to English, but something is lost in translation; for example, I did not actually swim next to the alligator to capture its image, and in the eclipse photo the diamond ring effect is incorrectly translated as Bailey’s beads.

Enjoy!

2017: A Photographic Retrospective

My first year as a full-time professional photographer has flown by. In addition to major travels to India, London, Oregon (to cover the total solar eclipse), Vietnam, and Cambodia, I also had the opportunity to shoot more than 150 local SF Bay Area festivals, street fairs, performances, sporting events, and breaking news stories.



Travel photography is my primary specialty: I lead photography tours in destinations around the world and place my own images in magazines, newspapers, and travel websites. While not traveling, I freelance for local newspapers and shoot for private clients including musicians, dancers, and theater companies.




My photography website has logged nearly 2 million page views, and I also publish a daily travel photography blog. I was honored to have been named a winner of the prestigious international competition Travel Photographer of the Year and a finalist for National Geographic’s Travel Photography competition. In Salem, Oregon for the eclipse, I delivered a lecture to an audience of 400 eclipse chasers and was interviewed by the New York Times.




It’s been a thrilling transitional year, and I’m very excited to continue my artistic and business growth in 2018. Thank you so much for your ongoing support.




Please enjoy this small sampler of some of my favorite images from the past year!  2017 Year in Review







News Flash: Google Removes Popular “View Images” Button: Why google removed this feature and what it means for photographers

Two days ago, Google rather quietly removed a very popular feature from its search functionality.  As part of a legal settlement with the powerful Getty Images stock photography agency, the search behemoth has agreed to remove the “view images” button that appeared whenever a search result included images.  Clicking on this button would open the image directly in the user’s browser, allowing them to bypass a visit to the website containing the matched image.  Now that word is getting out about this popular feature being removed, the Internet is up in arms, with thousands crying foul and lambasting both companies for this decision.  In today’s post, I focus instead on what this change means for photographers and other intellectual property owners.  And guess what?  It’s a good thing, not a bad thing.

The Web is a mixed bag for photographers.  On the one hand, the Web offers us an instantaneous and inexpensive way for our work to be seen by potentially billions of people around the world.  For professional photographers, the technology allows us to deliver work to clients, share our art, and make new sales with relatively little cost or effort.  On the other hand, the Web also makes it incredibly easy for people to steal our work.  I recently conducted a reverse image search on one of my most popular (and valuable) images, the multiple international-award-winning shot of an alligator with its reflection in the waters of a Louisiana bayou, and found that it currently lives in more than 300 places around the world on the Internet.  A few dozen of those sites are authorized to use my image, such as legitimate news agencies reporting on my having won the awards and certain clients to whom I have licensed the right to use the image, but nearly all of the sites’ publishers are using my work without permission.  In other words, they are thieves.

For photographers, our images represent countless hours of hard work, the application of our talent accrued over a lifetime, considerable financial investment in gear and travel, and for professionals, our livelihood.  The fact that it is convenient and easy to steal our work does not make it ethical or legal to do so.  By removing a search results feature that made theft extremely easy, Google has taken a serious step toward protecting intellectual property rights.

Of course it is still quite easy to grab images off the Web if you have a mind to.  You can click on the “visit page” button in the Google search results, find the image on the website, and right-click on it to save it on your device.  Photographers can make that process a bit harder by adding right-click protection to remind would-be thieves that the image is copyrighted, but there are plenty of ways to get around this protection.

The recent move by Google therefore won’t end the problem of digital image theft overnight, but it’s a good step in the right direction.  Image sharing and legitimate use is preserved, while making things just a tad harder for those who knowingly or unknowingly want to steal other people’s images off the Web.

Google has simultaneously ended the “Search By Image” button that popped up when a user opened an image.  I have mixed feelings about this decision, also a result of the settlement with Getty Images.  While this feature could be used by thieves who want to find un-watermarked copies of photos somewhere on the Web, it’s also very useful for photographers who need to know where our images are appearing around the world.  Fortunately, you can still use this feature simply by dragging the image into the search bar at the top of your browser’s screen.

I hope this post from a working photographer’s perspective will help defuse some of the animus hurled against Google from angry Internet users.  Removing the “View Images” button doesn’t solve all intellectual property theft in one simple move, but it is a reasonable step toward the goal of protecting image copyrights, and that’s a good thing for us photographers and, ultimately, for all users of images.  Because if photographers can’t make a living selling our work, very soon there won’t be any pro-quality images out there.

Do you agree with my viewpoint?  Or do you have a differing opinion?  Please share your comments here!

Want to read my earlier post about what to do if your images are stolen?  Find it here: What to do if your images are stolen.

 

Will Photography Soon Be Obsolete? [Encore Publicaton]: Musings on AI as artist

A friend recently pondered via a social media post whether we will have photography as we know it in the future, or if artificial intelligence (AI) will soon generate all of our images.  With tens of millions of people now capturing snapshots on their phones’ cameras and instantly applying AI-generated filters to enhance or modify the images, we can certainly observe an increasing trend toward computer involvement in the making of photos.  But I don’t believe AI will replace the artist’s eye in the making of fine-art photographs for quite some time to come.  Here are a few semi-random musings on this theme.

A machine can certainly generate bad art.  In college in the mid-1980s, I wrote a program for my Computer Science final exam that composed musical canons (pieces in which each voice plays the same melody together, but starting at different times).  My code used a semi-random configuration of musical intervals as the opening melody, then applied a simplified set of the rules of counterpoint (how musical lines are allowed to fit together) to complete the canon.  I received an “A” for this project, but truth to tell, any listener familiar with classical music could instantly discern that the pieces composed by my program weren’t anything like the lovely canons written by Telemann, for example.  In other words, my AI didn’t pass the Turing Test.

In the more than 30 years since I wrote that program, AI has progressed by leaps and bounds.  Computers can now generate poetry, classical and jazz music, and even paintings that many non-experts judge as products of human artistic creativity.  I’m fascinated by the progress, but so far the best of the AI-generated “art” is really just imitation and trickery: it takes a seed of something original such as a photograph or a melody, and transforms it using a set of complex rules that could be described as a pre-programmed artistic style into something pleasant enough but not inspiring.

In his landmark 1979 book, “Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid,” Douglas Hofstadter amazed the world by demonstrating comparable interlocking themes of grace and elegance among the very different disciplines of mathematics, visual art, and music.  He even speculated on the ability of machines to create works of great insight.  But Hofstadter’s proposed approach differed from that of the AI field that has developed since then in that he favored teaching machines to create via an understanding of how the human mind creates, as opposed to today’s AI approach of taking mountains of data and throwing brute force calculations at it.  To my eye, ear, and mind, this brute force method is the reason most of today’s attempts to artificially emulate the creative process are not insightful and do not add anything to their genres.  And so far, the vast majority of these attempts fail their respective Turing Tests.  That is, humans can tell it is a machine and not a human generating the “art.”

Applying these musings to the art of photography, what do see today?  To be sure, more images are being generated today than ever before in human history, and the art of photography is being devalued by its sheer pervasiveness.  Everyone captures images now, and most of them believe that makes them photographers.  While photographers have always required the involvement of a machine in the creation of their art, good photographers have always relied on their artistic vision, the so-called artist’s eye, to create images that are special.  I don’t believe that all the Meitu and similar AI filters that abound today are creating any photographic art that adds insight or helps interpret the world around us.

One very central component in photography is composition.  How does the photographer choose what elements to include in the image, and how will these elements be combined?  Read my recent post on composition here: Post on Composition.  This vital aspect of photography does use some “rules”, such as the Rule of Thirds, Leading Lines, Framing Elements, Point of View, Foreground/Background, and Symmetry and Patterns.  Rules, of course, can be programmed into an AI so that the machine can emulate the way humans create.  But in photographic composition, the “rules” are really just guidelines for getting started.  A good photographer knows when to break the rules for artistic impact.

Even the dumbest devices are capable of generating images.  Security cameras can capture images that we would consider to be rudimentary documentary photographs.  Given long enough, a security camera might accidentally capture what we would consider to be a good street photography image, because after capturing millions of dull scenes, sooner or later the camera will catch a random alignment of interesting elements.  It’s like thousands of monkeys typing random characters: given enough time, one of them will coincidentally type out a Shakespeare sonnet or even a full play.  As wearable computing devices become more pervasive, many people’s lives will be documented in real-time via the capture of millions of images.  Some of these may be interesting to their friends and perhaps the general public.  A few may even have artistic value.  But true artistry isn’t characterized by coincidence.

I don’t doubt that eventually we will get to the point where machines can create images as good as much of what humans can create.  I think we’ll get there, but it will take a long, long time.  And in the meantime, the role of photographer as artist, experimenter, and interpreter of the world around us will continue to be central to our society’s need for communication and expression.

What do you think about the future of photography?  Will we soon see machines creating much of our imagery?  How about our good, artistic imagery?  Please share your thoughts here.

2017: A Photographic Retrospective

My first year as a full-time professional photographer has flown by. In addition to major travels to India, London, Oregon (to cover the total solar eclipse), Vietnam, and Cambodia, I also had the opportunity to shoot more than 150 local SF Bay Area festivals, street fairs, performances, sporting events, and breaking news stories.



Travel photography is my primary specialty: I lead photography tours in destinations around the world and place my own images in magazines, newspapers, and travel websites. While not traveling, I freelance for local newspapers and shoot for private clients including musicians, dancers, and theater companies.




My photography website has logged nearly 2 million page views, and I also publish a daily travel photography blog. I was honored to have been named a winner of the prestigious international competition Travel Photographer of the Year and a finalist for National Geographic’s Travel Photography competition. In Salem, Oregon for the eclipse, I delivered a lecture to an audience of 400 eclipse chasers and was interviewed by the New York Times.




It’s been a thrilling transitional year, and I’m very excited to continue my artistic and business growth in 2018. Thank you so much for your ongoing support.




Please enjoy this small sampler of some of my favorite images from the past year!  2017 Year in Review







Dispatches Magazine Story [Encore Publication]: My article on travel photography in Patagonia is published by a leading travel magazine

Dear Readers,

As a travel photographer and writer, I strive to place my stories and images in magazines, newspapers, and websites for travel companies.  My piece on travel photography in Patagonia was just published in Dispatches Magazine.  Dispatches is the quarterly glossy print magazine from Overseas Adventure Travel, one of the largest travel companies in the USA.

I also appreciate the introduction from Overseas Adventure Travel’s Vice Chairman and travel industry leader, Harriet Lewis: “Kyle Adler belongs behind a lens. In the hands of a master, a camera can actually create connections with local people and bring their culture to life. Kyle is a 10-time O.A.T. traveler, and he creates stunning photo narratives of his trips.”

Please take a look!  And thanks, as always, for your great support.

Read Kyle’s article in Dispatches Magazine

Warm Regards,

Kyle

2017: A Photographic Retrospective

My first year as a full-time professional photographer has flown by. In addition to major travels to India, London, Oregon (to cover the total solar eclipse), Vietnam, and Cambodia, I also had the opportunity to shoot more than 150 local SF Bay Area festivals, street fairs, performances, sporting events, and breaking news stories.



Travel photography is my primary specialty: I lead photography tours in destinations around the world and place my own images in magazines, newspapers, and travel websites. While not traveling, I freelance for local newspapers and shoot for private clients including musicians, dancers, and theater companies.




My photography website has logged nearly 2 million page views, and I also publish a daily travel photography blog. I was honored to have been named a winner of the prestigious international competition Travel Photographer of the Year and a finalist for National Geographic’s Travel Photography competition. In Salem, Oregon for the eclipse, I delivered a lecture to an audience of 400 eclipse chasers and was interviewed by the New York Times.




It’s been a thrilling transitional year, and I’m very excited to continue my artistic and business growth in 2018. Thank you so much for your ongoing support.




Please enjoy this small sampler of some of my favorite images from the past year!  2017 Year in Review







2017: A Photographic Retrospective

My first year as a full-time professional photographer has flown by. In addition to major travels to India, London, Oregon (to cover the total solar eclipse), Vietnam, and Cambodia, I also had the opportunity to shoot more than 150 local SF Bay Area festivals, street fairs, performances, sporting events, and breaking news stories.



Travel photography is my primary specialty: I lead photography tours in destinations around the world and place my own images in magazines, newspapers, and travel websites. While not traveling, I freelance for local newspapers and shoot for private clients including musicians, dancers, and theater companies.




My photography website has logged nearly 2 million page views, and I also publish a daily travel photography blog. I was honored to have been named a winner of the prestigious international competition Travel Photographer of the Year and a finalist for National Geographic’s Travel Photography competition. In Salem, Oregon for the eclipse, I delivered a lecture to an audience of 400 eclipse chasers and was interviewed by the New York Times.




It’s been a thrilling transitional year, and I’m very excited to continue my artistic and business growth in 2018. Thank you so much for your ongoing support.




Please enjoy this small sampler of some of my favorite images from the past year!  2017 Year in Review







Dispatches Magazine Story [Encore Publication]: My article on travel photography in Patagonia is published by a leading travel magazine

Dear Readers,

As a travel photographer and writer, I strive to place my stories and images in magazines, newspapers, and websites for travel companies.  My piece on travel photography in Patagonia was just published in Dispatches Magazine.  Dispatches is the quarterly glossy print magazine from Overseas Adventure Travel, one of the largest travel companies in the USA.

I also appreciate the introduction from Overseas Adventure Travel’s Vice Chairman and travel industry leader, Harriet Lewis: “Kyle Adler belongs behind a lens. In the hands of a master, a camera can actually create connections with local people and bring their culture to life. Kyle is a 10-time O.A.T. traveler, and he creates stunning photo narratives of his trips.”

Please take a look!  And thanks, as always, for your great support.

Read Kyle’s article in Dispatches Magazine

Warm Regards,

Kyle

Please Come to Our Arts Benefit today in San Francisco: Helping those Impacted by the recent Natural Disasters

SF Bay Area friends: Please come to our Arts Benefit today (Sunday, December 3, 2017) from 12-4 PM at the Polish Club in San Francisco. The proceeds will go to help the children impacted by the Northern California fires and the recent hurricanes. I am one of the featured artists. A large print of my Travel Photographer of the Year award-winning image will be presented to the winner of the raffle, and I also will be selling prints of many of my favorite images to benefit the kids affected by the recent natural disasters. There will be food, music, art, and fun. Please drop by if you can!

Click here for more details and to purchase tickets: Arts Benefit info and tickets.

Focus on Tourettes without Regrets [Encore Publication]: Adventures shooting a long-running underground performance event in Oakland

When I’m not traveling, I am fortunate to live in the San Francisco Bay Area, where there is never any shortage of amazing photographic subjects.  In a typical week I conduct about 3-4 shoots and I’m always on the lookout for new experiences that will enhance the diversity of my portfolio.  Recently I was invited to shoot the latest monthly show of Tourettes without Regrets, a long-running underground performance held in Oakland, California.  Attracting an extremely diverse and hip young audience, Tourettes presents a completely different variety show each month that can be described as equal parts comedy, poetry slam, circus, battle rap, and burlesque.  While the show is remarkably edgy and raucous (this is a PG-13 rated blog, so you’ll have to visit my main portfolio website to see many of the edgier images), in true Bay Area style it never puts anyone down and instead celebrates all of our differences.  A hot, smoke-filled, jam-packed warehouse, entirely dark save for a few bizarrely colored LED spotlights, is not an environment that is particularly photography-friendly, but I was able to make some nice images through perseverance and creative post-processing.  In this post, I share some of my favorite images along with a bit of discussion about how they were made.

Emcee and Tourettes without Regrets curator, Jamie, introduces the show.  The warehouse was so packed with young spectators that I had to shoot around them with a moderate, fast telephoto lens.  In post-processing, I cropped the image to remove unwanted elements and adjusted the shadow tones to darken the background.  Buy this photo

This month, the show’s theme was “F*** Valentine’s Day”, so each act consisted of a pair of performers.  These two ladies presented an aerial act that was mesmerizing but challenging to shoot due to the long distance to the subject, low light conditions, and strangely colored LED spotlights.  I cropped the image in post-processing and converted it to black-and-white to avoid the strange color cast.  Buy this photo

This skit depicts a woman breaking up with her boyfriend, who then tries to win her back with tears, money, and even a marriage proposal.  Nothing works, until he begins to treat her poorly, at which point she decides she wants him, after all.  The image captures an apt moment in the drama.  Buy this photo

A Crocodile Dundee-style knife thrower and his lovely assistant prepare to terrify a volunteer from the audience.  To capture this act I had to use a high ISO setting and fast lens due to the low lighting and the requirement for a fast shutter speed.  During post-processing, I converted to black-and-white, increased the contrast and adjusted the color channels to enhance the dramatic feel, applied noise reduction to reduce problems associated with the high ISO setting, and cropped to remove extraneous elements.  Buy this photo

A hip hop dancer amazes the crowd.  A fast shutter speed was essential to freeze the motion.  Obviously, to achieve a fast shutter speed, I needed to use a fast lens and high ISO setting.  Shoot lots of frames in situations like this one, because you can never be sure when the best exact instant will present itself.  Buy this photo

This scene from a battle rap, where two freestyle rappers trade insults, captures the essence of their interaction.  Note the shallow depth-of-field places the emphasis on the performer not rapping at the time, with only the outstretched left arm of the other rapper in focus.  I then converted to black-and-white to remove the color cast and cropped tightly using a square aspect ration to achieve an edgy Instagram-style image.  Buy this photo

What are some of your favorite subjects to shoot in your neck of the woods?  What events epitomize for you the area in which you live?  Please share your thoughts here.

Want to read more posts about what to shoot while traveling or near home?  Find them all here: Posts on What to Shoot.

“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to be a winner of the Travel Photographer of the Year competition

Dear Readers,

Three months ago I made a whirlwind trip to London to receive my award and attend the opening of the exhibition for the prestigious Travel Photographer of the Year competition.  I was named a winner in the Wildlife and Nature category for my image of an alligator and its reflection in a Louisiana bayou.  TPOTY is considered by many in the industry to be the premier international travel photography competition.  A panel of highly regarded judges considered tens of thousands of entrants from 123 countries.

The experience attending the exhibition opening was exhilarating.  I had the amazing opportunity to meet the competition’s organizers, many of the esteemed judges, and several fellow winning photographers.  I was interviewed on-camera for British news outlets.  The quality of the show is first-rate.  Until the opening, I’d never seen my winning image displayed as a photograph should be: printed at museum quality to a large size, and properly lit.  The TPOTY exhibition started in July at the UK City of Culture festival in Hull, ran in London through September 3, and then moves on to several international venues.

Check out this brief 3-minute video recently published by Travel Photographer of the Year, featuring the London exhibition opening from this past August. My dear friends Patty and David Sanders, who attended with me, appear in the feature frame on TPOTY’s home page. I am honored to have been interviewed as a winner, and an excerpt appears in the video beginning at 1:50.  Watch the video here: TPOTY Exhibition Opening Video.

My winning image may be purchased on TPOTY’s website in formats ranging from a postcard for less than one British pound up through a large framed museum-quality print.  The retrospective book featuring all winning images can also be purchased on this site: Travel Photographer of the Year online store.

Feeling very honored and humbled by this major validation of my recent career change.

Thank you for your incredible support thus far.  Please invite your friends and family members who are also passionate about travel and/or photography to join us here at To Travel Hopefully.  Here’s to the many further travel photography adventures we will share together!

Cheers,

Kyle Adler

 

Dispatches Magazine Story [Encore Publication]: My article on travel photography in Patagonia is published by a leading travel magazine

Dear Readers,

As a travel photographer and writer, I strive to place my stories and images in magazines, newspapers, and websites for travel companies.  My piece on travel photography in Patagonia was just published in Dispatches Magazine.  Dispatches is the quarterly glossy print magazine from Overseas Adventure Travel, one of the largest travel companies in the USA.

I also appreciate the introduction from Overseas Adventure Travel’s Vice Chairman and travel industry leader, Harriet Lewis: “Kyle Adler belongs behind a lens. In the hands of a master, a camera can actually create connections with local people and bring their culture to life. Kyle is a 10-time O.A.T. traveler, and he creates stunning photo narratives of his trips.”

Please take a look!  And thanks, as always, for your great support.

Read Kyle’s article in Dispatches Magazine

Warm Regards,

Kyle

To Travel Hopefully is Taking the Day Off: Please help support this site

Dear Reader,

To Travel Hopefully is taking the day off, but don’t worry, we’ll be back with fresh new content soon.

In the meantime, please take a look at the helpful travel photography tips and inspiring images in our archived posts.  Just select a category (Destinations, Gear, Techniques, Travel, etc.) from the right nav bar, or choose a month under Archives, and browse to your heart’s content.

While you’re here, take a moment to tell your friends and family about us.  Anyone who enjoys travel and wants to improve their photography will find great daily content here, including inspiring images from around the world and tips and tricks for making the best possible photos.  You can email any post or share it via social media with the click of one of the buttons at the end of each post.  And if you enjoy To Travel Hopefully, please click in the right nav bar to subscribe via email or RSS feed, so you won’t miss a single post.

Please consider supporting this site by purchasing some of my photos, browsing for some great gear via the Amazon links, or clicking on some of the ads that interest you.

My holiday special promotion has ended, but I have lowered most of my regular prices considerably.  Fine art prints and novelty items are available in a wide variety of sizes and price ranges for nearly every image in my portfolio.  Please take a look at Featured Photos to see a sampling of my images available for purchase.

And finally, I’d like to share some exciting news: From Jan. 24 through Feb. 8, I will be leading a photography tour through the north of India.  This adventure will go way beyond the usual postcard-style shots to give photographers of all skill levels many unique opportunities to make images you won’t find elsewhere.  Find the details here:   Incredible India Tour.

Thank you for visiting To Travel Hopefully!  Without your support, this project cannot continue providing you with daily content including inspiring travel photos and tips and tricks for making great images.

Warm regards,

Kyle Adler

Focus on Tourettes without Regrets [Encore Publication]: Adventures shooting a long-running underground performance event in Oakland

When I’m not traveling, I am fortunate to live in the San Francisco Bay Area, where there is never any shortage of amazing photographic subjects.  In a typical week I conduct about 3-4 shoots and I’m always on the lookout for new experiences that will enhance the diversity of my portfolio.  Recently I was invited to shoot the latest monthly show of Tourettes without Regrets, a long-running underground performance held in Oakland, California.  Attracting an extremely diverse and hip young audience, Tourettes presents a completely different variety show each month that can be described as equal parts comedy, poetry slam, circus, battle rap, and burlesque.  While the show is remarkably edgy and raucous (this is a PG-13 rated blog, so you’ll have to visit my main portfolio website to see many of the edgier images), in true Bay Area style it never puts anyone down and instead celebrates all of our differences.  A hot, smoke-filled, jam-packed warehouse, entirely dark save for a few bizarrely colored LED spotlights, is not an environment that is particularly photography-friendly, but I was able to make some nice images through perseverance and creative post-processing.  In this post, I share some of my favorite images along with a bit of discussion about how they were made.

Emcee and Tourettes without Regrets curator, Jamie, introduces the show.  The warehouse was so packed with young spectators that I had to shoot around them with a moderate, fast telephoto lens.  In post-processing, I cropped the image to remove unwanted elements and adjusted the shadow tones to darken the background.  Buy this photo

This month, the show’s theme was “F*** Valentine’s Day”, so each act consisted of a pair of performers.  These two ladies presented an aerial act that was mesmerizing but challenging to shoot due to the long distance to the subject, low light conditions, and strangely colored LED spotlights.  I cropped the image in post-processing and converted it to black-and-white to avoid the strange color cast.  Buy this photo

This skit depicts a woman breaking up with her boyfriend, who then tries to win her back with tears, money, and even a marriage proposal.  Nothing works, until he begins to treat her poorly, at which point she decides she wants him, after all.  The image captures an apt moment in the drama.  Buy this photo

A Crocodile Dundee-style knife thrower and his lovely assistant prepare to terrify a volunteer from the audience.  To capture this act I had to use a high ISO setting and fast lens due to the low lighting and the requirement for a fast shutter speed.  During post-processing, I converted to black-and-white, increased the contrast and adjusted the color channels to enhance the dramatic feel, applied noise reduction to reduce problems associated with the high ISO setting, and cropped to remove extraneous elements.  Buy this photo

A hip hop dancer amazes the crowd.  A fast shutter speed was essential to freeze the motion.  Obviously, to achieve a fast shutter speed, I needed to use a fast lens and high ISO setting.  Shoot lots of frames in situations like this one, because you can never be sure when the best exact instant will present itself.  Buy this photo

This scene from a battle rap, where two freestyle rappers trade insults, captures the essence of their interaction.  Note the shallow depth-of-field places the emphasis on the performer not rapping at the time, with only the outstretched left arm of the other rapper in focus.  I then converted to black-and-white to remove the color cast and cropped tightly using a square aspect ration to achieve an edgy Instagram-style image.  Buy this photo

What are some of your favorite subjects to shoot in your neck of the woods?  What events epitomize for you the area in which you live?  Please share your thoughts here.

Want to read more posts about what to shoot while traveling or near home?  Find them all here: Posts on What to Shoot.

Dispatches Magazine Story: My article on travel photography in Patagonia is published by a leading travel magazine

Dear Readers,

As a travel photographer and writer, I strive to place my stories and images in magazines, newspapers, and websites for travel companies.  My piece on travel photography in Patagonia was just published in Dispatches Magazine.  Dispatches is the quarterly glossy print magazine from Overseas Adventure Travel, one of the largest travel companies in the USA.

I also appreciate the introduction from Overseas Adventure Travel’s Vice Chairman and travel industry leader, Harriet Lewis: “Kyle Adler belongs behind a lens. In the hands of a master, a camera can actually create connections with local people and bring their culture to life. Kyle is a 10-time O.A.T. traveler, and he creates stunning photo narratives of his trips.”

Please take a look!  And thanks, as always, for your great support.

Read Kyle’s article in Dispatches Magazine

Warm Regards,

Kyle