“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to be a winner of the Travel Photographer of the Year competition

Dear Readers,

Three months ago I made a whirlwind trip to London to receive my award and attend the opening of the exhibition for the prestigious Travel Photographer of the Year competition.  I was named a winner in the Wildlife and Nature category for my image of an alligator and its reflection in a Louisiana bayou.  TPOTY is considered by many in the industry to be the premier international travel photography competition.  A panel of highly regarded judges considered tens of thousands of entrants from 123 countries.

The experience attending the exhibition opening was exhilarating.  I had the amazing opportunity to meet the competition’s organizers, many of the esteemed judges, and several fellow winning photographers.  I was interviewed on-camera for British news outlets.  The quality of the show is first-rate.  Until the opening, I’d never seen my winning image displayed as a photograph should be: printed at museum quality to a large size, and properly lit.  The TPOTY exhibition started in July at the UK City of Culture festival in Hull, ran in London through September 3, and then moves on to several international venues.

Check out this brief 3-minute video recently published by Travel Photographer of the Year, featuring the London exhibition opening from this past August. My dear friends Patty and David Sanders, who attended with me, appear in the feature frame on TPOTY’s home page. I am honored to have been interviewed as a winner, and an excerpt appears in the video beginning at 1:50.  Watch the video here: TPOTY Exhibition Opening Video.

My winning image may be purchased on TPOTY’s website in formats ranging from a postcard for less than one British pound up through a large framed museum-quality print.  The retrospective book featuring all winning images can also be purchased on this site: Travel Photographer of the Year online store.

Feeling very honored and humbled by this major validation of my recent career change.

Thank you for your incredible support thus far.  Please invite your friends and family members who are also passionate about travel and/or photography to join us here at To Travel Hopefully.  Here’s to the many further travel photography adventures we will share together!

Cheers,

Kyle Adler

 

“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to be a winner of the Travel Photographer of the Year competition

Dear Readers,

Two months ago I made a whirlwind trip to London to receive my award and attend the opening of the exhibition for the prestigious Travel Photographer of the Year competition.  I was named a winner in the Wildlife and Nature category for my image of an alligator and its reflection in a Louisiana bayou.  TPOTY is considered by many in the industry to be the premier international travel photography competition.  A panel of highly regarded judges considered tens of thousands of entrants from 123 countries.

The experience attending the exhibition opening was exhilarating.  I had the amazing opportunity to meet the competition’s organizers, many of the esteemed judges, and several fellow winning photographers.  I was interviewed on-camera for British news outlets.  The quality of the show is first-rate.  Until the opening, I’d never seen my winning image displayed as a photograph should be: printed at museum quality to a large size, and properly lit.  The TPOTY exhibition started in July at the UK City of Culture festival in Hull, ran in London through September 3, and then moves on to several international venues.

Check out this brief 3-minute video recently published by Travel Photographer of the Year, featuring the London exhibition opening from this past August. My dear friends Patty and David Sanders, who attended with me, appear in the feature frame on TPOTY’s home page. I am honored to have been interviewed as a winner, and an excerpt appears in the video beginning at 1:50.  Watch the video here: TPOTY Exhibition Opening Video.

My winning image may be purchased on TPOTY’s website in formats ranging from a postcard for less than one British pound up through a large framed museum-quality print.  The retrospective book featuring all winning images can also be purchased on this site: Travel Photographer of the Year online store.

Feeling very honored and humbled by this major validation of my recent career change.

Thank you for your incredible support thus far.  Please invite your friends and family members who are also passionate about travel and/or photography to join us here at To Travel Hopefully.  Here’s to the many further travel photography adventures we will share together!

Cheers,

Kyle Adler

 

“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to be a winner of the Travel Photographer of the Year competition

Dear Readers,

I’m just home after a whirlwind trip to London to receive my award and attend the opening of the exhibition for the prestigious Travel Photographer of the Year competition.  I was named a winner in the Wildlife and Nature category for my image of an alligator and its reflection in a Louisiana bayou.  TPOTY is considered by many in the industry to be the premier international travel photography competition.  A panel of highly regarded judges considered tens of thousands of entrants from 123 countries.

The experience attending the exhibition opening was exhilarating.  I had the amazing opportunity to meet the competition’s organizers, many of the esteemed judges, and several fellow winning photographers.  I was interviewed on-camera for British news outlets.  The quality of the show is first-rate.  Until the opening, I’d never seen my winning image displayed as a photograph should be: printed at museum quality to a large size, and properly lit.  The TPOTY exhibition started last month at the UK City of Culture festival in Hull, runs in London through September 3, and then moves on to several international venues.

My image may be purchased on TPOTY’s website in formats ranging from a postcard for less than one British pound up through a large framed museum-quality print.  The retrospective book featuring all winning images can also be purchased on this site: Travel Photographer of the Year online store.

Feeling very honored and humbled by this major validation of my recent career change.

Thank you for your incredible support thus far.  Please invite your friends and family members who are also passionate about travel and/or photography to join us here at To Travel Hopefully.  Here’s to the many further travel photography adventures we will share together!

Cheers,

Kyle Adler

 

New Year’s Resolutions [Encore Publication]: My opinionated list of the top 5 promises all travel photographers should make and keep

Personally, I’m not a big fan of new year’s resolutions.  Common sense dictates that if we really want to make change in our lives, we should resolve to take specific steps toward that change every day.  Promises we make on December 31 each year will most likely be broken by January 15.  That’s certainly what I’ve observed over many years on the running trails and gyms where I’ve run or worked out daily.  A huge surge in attendance begins on January 1 and dissipates within about two weeks.

So I waited a couple of weeks to share my thoughts on what we travel photographers should resolve to do differently.  Since these aren’t technically “new year’s resolutions,” it’s my hope that these practices will stick.

  1. Book that once-in-a-lifetime trip now:
    Visit that exotic destination you’ve always wanted to see!  Buy this photo
    That travel photography “bucket list” needs to be emptied before you kick the proverbial bucket.  I know too many people who always found excuses to put off taking the trips they most desired, until it became too late for them.  The kids are too young, my job is too demanding right now, I can’t afford the cost.  I’ve made these excuses, too.  But the one thing we can’t live a full life without and can’t ever lose once we’ve attained it is experience.  Every trip I’ve taken helped me grow as a person and as a photographer, and also helped me grow closer to my family and other travel companions.  So book that trip today and go this year.  You won’t regret it.
  2. Just get out there and shoot:
    USAThere are countless exciting subjects for your photography within a few miles of your home.  Buy this photo
    Even professional travel photographers can’t be on a lengthy shoot in an exotic part of the globe all the time.  So, book those once (or a few times) in a lifetime trips as soon as feasible, but in the meantime find some wonderful local attractions where you can hone your craft by making compelling images.  I love to shoot little-known local cultural events such as street fairs and performances of dance, theater, and music.  It’s also a great pleasure to find scenic spots near home where we can make some striking landscape images that haven’t been shot thousands of times before.  Remember, you’re the local expert near your home, so seek out frequent opportunities to shoot in your own community.
  3.  Learn to use your camera as a tool to bridge the gap between your culture and the culture of the land you’re visiting:
    CubaPhotography can bring us closer to the people we meet on our journeys.  Buy this photo
    Instead of letting your photography separate you from the people you’ve come to learn from, resolve to turn your image-making into an opportunity to meet more people and get to know them more deeply.  Check out my pillar post on how to do this: Post on Photography as a Cultural Bridging Tool.
  4. Approach wildlife with respect:
    The more we learn about and respect the fauna we encounter during our travels, the healthier they will emerge from the experience (and the better our images will turn out).  Buy this photo
    A photo safari is a life-changing experience and should be on every travel photographer’s list.  But just as our cameras can be used either to alienate local people or to bond with them, so can photographing animals be used to harm them or to respect and help preserve them.  Read this post for more detailed tips (Post on Wildlife Photography), but in the meantime I will summarize by emphasizing the importance of prioritizing the animal’s welfare ahead of our desire to get an amazing shot of it.  Getting too close to wildlife will stress the animal and could even cause it to become lunch (or cause a predator to starve by losing its meal).  The more we get to know a species’ behavior before encountering it in the wild, the better our images will be and the healthier the animal will emerge from the encounter.
  5. Continually improve technique:
    I strive to hone my technique with every shoot.  Buy this photo
    There are more important elements in photography than technique, but a mastery of technique does help us make the images we want, so I always work to improve mine.  If you haven’t already gained the confidence to shoot in manual mode, start learning now.  Remember that while cameras have become very smart, they aren’t artists and they can’t know what the photographer is trying to achieve, so learn to take control of your camera’s settings today.  Here’s a short post listing five key techniques that will help your images stand out: Post on Top Five photography “hacks”.

So, resolve to take that trip of a lifetime, shoot locally while you’re waiting for it, learn to use your camera as a tool to interact beneficially with the people and the wildlife you meet during your travels, and work to hone your technique.  I’ll be doing the same!  Happy trails in 2017.

What do you resolve to do in 2017?  Please share your thoughts here.

New Year’s Resolutions [Encore Publication]: My opinionated list of the top 5 promises all travel photographers should make and keep

Personally, I’m not a big fan of new year’s resolutions.  Common sense dictates that if we really want to make change in our lives, we should resolve to take specific steps toward that change every day.  Promises we make on December 31 each year will most likely be broken by January 15.  That’s certainly what I’ve observed over many years on the running trails and gyms where I’ve run or worked out daily.  A huge surge in attendance begins on January 1 and dissipates within about two weeks.

So I waited a couple of weeks to share my thoughts on what we travel photographers should resolve to do differently.  Since these aren’t technically “new year’s resolutions,” it’s my hope that these practices will stick.

  1. Book that once-in-a-lifetime trip now:
    Visit that exotic destination you’ve always wanted to see!  Buy this photo
    That travel photography “bucket list” needs to be emptied before you kick the proverbial bucket.  I know too many people who always found excuses to put off taking the trips they most desired, until it became too late for them.  The kids are too young, my job is too demanding right now, I can’t afford the cost.  I’ve made these excuses, too.  But the one thing we can’t live a full life without and can’t ever lose once we’ve attained it is experience.  Every trip I’ve taken helped me grow as a person and as a photographer, and also helped me grow closer to my family and other travel companions.  So book that trip today and go this year.  You won’t regret it.
  2. Just get out there and shoot:
    USAThere are countless exciting subjects for your photography within a few miles of your home.  Buy this photo
    Even professional travel photographers can’t be on a lengthy shoot in an exotic part of the globe all the time.  So, book those once (or a few times) in a lifetime trips as soon as feasible, but in the meantime find some wonderful local attractions where you can hone your craft by making compelling images.  I love to shoot little-known local cultural events such as street fairs and performances of dance, theater, and music.  It’s also a great pleasure to find scenic spots near home where we can make some striking landscape images that haven’t been shot thousands of times before.  Remember, you’re the local expert near your home, so seek out frequent opportunities to shoot in your own community.
  3.  Learn to use your camera as a tool to bridge the gap between your culture and the culture of the land you’re visiting:
    CubaPhotography can bring us closer to the people we meet on our journeys.  Buy this photo
    Instead of letting your photography separate you from the people you’ve come to learn from, resolve to turn your image-making into an opportunity to meet more people and get to know them more deeply.  Check out my pillar post on how to do this: Post on Photography as a Cultural Bridging Tool.
  4. Approach wildlife with respect:
    The more we learn about and respect the fauna we encounter during our travels, the healthier they will emerge from the experience (and the better our images will turn out).  Buy this photo
    A photo safari is a life-changing experience and should be on every travel photographer’s list.  But just as our cameras can be used either to alienate local people or to bond with them, so can photographing animals be used to harm them or to respect and help preserve them.  Read this post for more detailed tips (Post on Wildlife Photography), but in the meantime I will summarize by emphasizing the importance of prioritizing the animal’s welfare ahead of our desire to get an amazing shot of it.  Getting too close to wildlife will stress the animal and could even cause it to become lunch (or cause a predator to starve by losing its meal).  The more we get to know a species’ behavior before encountering it in the wild, the better our images will be and the healthier the animal will emerge from the encounter.
  5. Continually improve technique:
    I strive to hone my technique with every shoot.  Buy this photo
    There are more important elements in photography than technique, but a mastery of technique does help us make the images we want, so I always work to improve mine.  If you haven’t already gained the confidence to shoot in manual mode, start learning now.  Remember that while cameras have become very smart, they aren’t artists and they can’t know what the photographer is trying to achieve, so learn to take control of your camera’s settings today.  Here’s a short post listing five key techniques that will help your images stand out: Post on Top Five photography “hacks”.

So, resolve to take that trip of a lifetime, shoot locally while you’re waiting for it, learn to use your camera as a tool to interact beneficially with the people and the wildlife you meet during your travels, and work to hone your technique.  I’ll be doing the same!  Happy trails in 2017.

What do you resolve to do in 2017?  Please share your thoughts here.

New Year’s Resolutions: My opinionated list of the top 5 promises all travel photographers should make and keep

Personally, I’m not a big fan of new year’s resolutions.  Common sense dictates that if we really want to make change in our lives, we should resolve to take specific steps toward that change every day.  Promises we make on December 31 each year will most likely be broken by January 15.  That’s certainly what I’ve observed over many years on the running trails and gyms where I run or work out daily.  A huge surge in attendance begins on January 1 and dissipates within about two weeks.

So I waited a couple of weeks to share my thoughts on what we travel photographers should resolve to do differently.  Since these aren’t technically “new year’s resolutions,” it’s my hope that these practices will stick.

  1. Book that once-in-a-lifetime trip now:
    Visit that exotic destination you’ve always wanted to see!  Buy this photo
    That travel photography “bucket list” needs to be emptied before you kick the proverbial bucket.  I know too many people who always found excuses to put off taking the trips they most desired, until it became too late for them.  The kids are too young, my job is too demanding right now, I can’t afford the cost.  I’ve made these excuses, too.  But the one thing we can’t live a full life without and can’t ever lose once we’ve attained it is experience.  Every trip I’ve taken helped me grow as a person and as a photographer, and also helped me grow closer to my family and other travel companions.  So book that trip today and go this year.  You won’t regret it.
  2. Just get out there and shoot:
    USAThere are countless exciting subjects for your photography within a few miles of your home.  Buy this photo
    Even professional travel photographers can’t be on a lengthy shoot in an exotic part of the globe all the time.  So, book those once (or a few times) in a lifetime trips as soon as feasible, but in the meantime find some wonderful local attractions where you can hone your craft by making compelling images.  I love to shoot little-known local cultural events such as street fairs and performances of dance, theater, and music.  It’s also a great pleasure to find scenic spots near home where we can make some striking landscape images that haven’t been shot thousands of times before.  Remember, you’re the local expert near your home, so seek out frequent opportunities to shoot in your own community.
  3.  Learn to use your camera as a tool to bridge the gap between your culture and the culture of the land you’re visiting:
    CubaPhotography can bring us closer to the people we meet on our journeys.  Buy this photo
    Instead of letting your photography separate you from the people you’ve come to learn from, resolve to turn your image-making into an opportunity to meet more people and get to know them more deeply.  Check out my pillar post on how to do this: Post on Photography as a Cultural Bridging Tool.
  4. Approach wildlife with respect:
    The more we learn about and respect the fauna we encounter during our travels, the healthier they will emerge from the experience (and the better our images will turn out).  Buy this photo
    A photo safari is a life-changing experience and should be on every travel photographer’s list.  But just as our cameras can be used either to alienate local people or to bond with them, so can photographing animals be used to harm them or to respect and help preserve them.  This will be the subject of an upcoming post, but in the meantime I will summarize by emphasizing the importance of prioritizing the animal’s welfare ahead of our desire to get an amazing shot of it.  Getting too close to wildlife will stress the animal and could even cause it to become lunch (or cause a predator to starve by losing its meal).  The more we get to know a species’ behavior before encountering it in the wild, the better our images will be and the healthier the animal will emerge from the encounter.
  5. Continually improve technique:
    I strive to hone my technique with every shoot.  Buy this photo
    There are more important elements in photography than technique, but a mastery of technique does help us make the images we want, so I always work to improve mine.  If you haven’t already gained the confidence to shoot in manual mode, start learning now.  Remember that while cameras have become very smart, they aren’t artists and they can’t know what the photographer is trying to achieve, so learn to take control of your camera’s settings today.  Here’s a short post listing five key techniques that will help your images stand out: Post on Top Five photography “hacks”.

So, resolve to take that trip of a lifetime, shoot locally while you’re waiting for it, learn to use your camera as a tool to interact beneficially with the people and the wildlife you meet during your travels, and work to hone your technique.  I’ll be doing the same!  Happy trails in 2017.

What do you resolve to do in 2017?  Please share your thoughts here.

“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to be a winner of the Travel Photographer of the Year competition

Dear Readers,

Very excited to share the news that I am a winner of the prestigious Travel Photographer of the Year competition.  I was named runner-up in the Wildlife and Nature category for my image of an alligator and its reflection in a Louisiana bayou.  TPOTY is considered by many in the industry to be the premier international travel photography competition.  A panel of highly regarded judges considered tens of thousands of entrants from 123 countries.

You can see the press release here: Travel Photographer of the Year.  So far there has been press coverage featuring my image in many news outlets including The Telegraph, The Mirror, The Daily Mail, The Guardian, The Sun, CNN, MSN, and AOL.  You can find the CNN coverage at CNN coverage of TPOTY (scroll through the images to see mine) and the Mirror coverage very prominently featuring my photo at Mirror coverage of TPOTY.  My image will be exhibited at the UK City of Culture festival, then in London, and on to international venues.

Feeling very honored and humbled by this major validation of my recent career change.

Thank you for your incredible support thus far.  Please invite your friends and family members who are also passionate about travel and/or photography to join us.  Here’s to the many further travel photography adventures we will share together!

Cheers,

Kyle Adler

“To Travel Hopefully” News Flash!: I am honored to be named a finalist in Travel Photographer of the Year competition

Dear Readers,

I am thrilled to have been named a finalist for the prestigious Travel Photographer of the Year award. TPOTY is considered by many in the industry to be the premier international travel photography competition.  Tens of thousands of entrants from 123 countries have been culled in two rounds of judging down to a shortlist of several dozen photographers.  I am the only American finalist in the Wildlife and Nature category.  Feeling very honored and humbled by this happy validation of my recent career change.  Please send your positive thoughts as we enter the third and final round of judging.  I’ll keep you posted.  If you’d like to learn more about TPOTY, here’s a link to their site: Travel Photographer of the Year.

Thank you for your incredible support thus far.  Please invite your friends and family members who are also passionate about travel and/or photography to join us.  Here’s to the many further travel photography adventures we will share together!

Cheers,

Kyle Adler